Films at Tennessee Theatre, art exhibits heat up February

An ethnic Miao girl wearing the traditional handcrafted silver headdress takes part in an annual Miao Fall Festival dance. Throughout her youth, a Miao girl is given additional ornaments and intricate layers for her headdress ending with large water buffalo-styled flat silver horns. This headdress becomes part of the dowry of a newly married female.

Photo by Dean Rice, Special to the News Sentinel

An ethnic Miao girl wearing the traditional handcrafted silver headdress takes part in an annual Miao Fall Festival dance. Throughout her youth, a Miao girl is given additional ornaments and intricate layers for her headdress ending with large water buffalo-styled flat silver horns. This headdress becomes part of the dowry of a newly married female.

Tennessee Theatre

Downtown - Knoxville

Theater

604 S Gay St

More Details »

Good-bye and good riddance January. Time for February with its hearts and flowers of Valentine’s Day and a few warmer steps closer to spring.

This year February at the historic Tennessee Theatre includes not only the usual romantic vintage film for Valentine’s but something so old it’s new. The 604 S. Gay St. theater built in 1928 hosts a silent film this weekend. And it’s not just any old pre-talkie. This is “The Eagle” starring legendary silent film star Rudolph Valentino. Knoxville’s Clarence Brown directed the 1925 costume adventure/romance set in Imperialist Russia.

“The Eagle” goes back in cinematic time at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 6. Organist Ron Carter of Marietta, Ga., will play the Tennessee’s Wurlitzer organ to accompany the film. The movie is presented by the Historic Tennessee Theatre Foundation and the Tennessee Archive of Moving Images and Sound.

Tickets, plus service fees, are $8 for adults; $6 for children under 12 or senior citizens age 60 and older. Tickets are at the theater box office, at 865-684-1200 or at http:// www.tennesseetheatre.com.

The Tennessee also has its Valentine’s movie ready. “Sabrina” with Humphrey Bogart, William Holden and the beautiful Audrey Hepburn in the title role plays at 8 p.m. Feb. 14 at the theater. Tickets are $8 and $6. This 1954 romance can even make you believe that a young, beautiful Hepburn falls for Bogart over a younger Holden.

February isn’t just about vintage film. It’s the month to recover from the overindulgence of December and the cold and snow of January and step outside. New art exhibits are opening within the coming weeks. Among them are two opening this weekend a few steps from each other. Each is the subject of an opening reception 5-9 p.m. Feb. 4 during downtown Knoxville’s monthly “First Friday” events.

The University of Tennessee Downtown Gallery, 106 S. Gay St., is the home to a newly created large-scale clay sculpture. Ceramic artist Walter McConnell worked with UT students to construct the unfired ceramic work. The work will be on display at the gallery through Feb. 26.

Emporium Center

Just a few feet down Gay, the photographs of Knoxville resident Dean Rice are shown in an exhibit entitled “Another Way of Life.” The exhibit displays photographs Rice took of the people and places in small, remote villages of southern China. Rice, who has taken photos for 25 years, is now the chief of staff to Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett. The photos will be on display through Feb. 25 in the Balcony of the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay St.

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