Film, TV projects piling up for Knox actor Linds Edwards

In the pilot episode for the new CBS series “Under the Dome,” Deputy Linda (Natalie Martinez, left) and her fiance, Rusty (Josh Carter), find themselves separated by a massive transparent dome that’s fallen on the town of Chester’s Mill. Knox native Linds Edwards also has a role in the show.

Photo by Best Possible Screen Grab, ÃÂé2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved

In the pilot episode for the new CBS series “Under the Dome,” Deputy Linda (Natalie Martinez, left) and her fiance, Rusty (Josh Carter), find themselves separated by a massive transparent dome that’s fallen on the town of Chester’s Mill. Knox native Linds Edwards also has a role in the show.

In the pilot episode for the new CBS series “Under the Dome,” Deputy Linda (Natalie Martinez, left) and her fiance, Rusty (Josh Carter), find themselves separated by a massive transparent dome that’s fallen on the town of Chester’s Mill. Knox native Linds Edwards also has a role in the show.

Photo by Best Possible Screen Grab

In the pilot episode for the new CBS series “Under the Dome,” Deputy Linda (Natalie Martinez, left) and her fiance, Rusty (Josh Carter), find themselves separated by a massive transparent dome that’s fallen on the town of Chester’s Mill. Knox native Linds Edwards also has a role in the show.

When you see Linds Edwards in a television show or feature film, don’t get too attached.

“One thing that I have established with myself is I’m great at playing villains, and I’m also great at dying,” says Edwards, chuckling.

He may end up dead on screen frequently, but Edwards’ career is very much alive. The 2003 Farragut High School graduate appears in a couple of episodes of the new CBS series “Under the Dome,” which premieres at 10 p.m. Monday (locally on WVLT, Channel 8).

He just landed a role on the Cinemax series “Banshee,” and he soon will appear on the big screen in “Homefront” alongside James Franco and Jason Statham. He made a big impression on the debut episode of “The Walking Dead” in 2010, and this year he appeared in two episodes of “Rectified” and in the TV movie “Ring of Fire” with Jewel.

“Under the Dome,” based on a novel by Stephen King, is about a small town suddenly sealed off from the rest of the world by a massive, transparent dome. It was filmed in Wilmington, N.C., and the surrounding area.

The 28-year-old says he liked his character, Waylon Dundee.

“I was like, oh my gosh, it’s like the guy I would love to be in real life, this kind of sneaky, smooth, really angry but doesn’t let it out until it’s time kind of person,” he says. “That whole thing was incredible because we were only supposed to be on one episode; then they made us two episodes.”

Born in Tampa, Fla., Edwards has lived in the Knoxville area since he was 10, and he is trying his best to keep his base here.

“I work pretty much out of Atlanta and New Orleans,” he says. “‘Rectify,’ which has got a season two now, is in Griffin, Ga., and I’m like a main character on the show. Season two is going to be wild; it starts sometime later on next year.”

Edwards met his wife, Ashley Shelton-Edwards, while they were acting in director Paul Harrill’s debut feature, “Something, Anything” (now in post-production), locally. After living in New York for a few months, he convinced her to settle here. They’re easily able to travel to jobs in the Southeast.

“Wilmington’s about nine hours (driving), but you go down there, and you’re at the beach,” he says. “So I spend two or three days filming, I go to the beach for two days, and then I go film the rest of it, and I’m done for that week.”

Edwards spent a year at Pellissippi State Community College, but he knew he needed a different kind of education. He focused on local acting projects, and after his agents at Talent Trek had his work in director Brooks Benjamin’s “Boys of Summerville” to show off, he quickly landed a role in “Get Low” with Robert Duvall.

“After ‘Get Low,’ it was on,” he says. “It started blowing up.”

Though he’s done his share of fantasy, Edwards says he prefers “intense drama.”

“When you look at people and what they’re going through and their dramas, that to me is so much more interesting than anything else,” he says.

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